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Findings

Coroners' Written Findings 

A written finding is a formal document handed down by a coroner following an investigation into a death or fire and is generally the final step in the coronial investigation process. 

A written finding following an investigation into a death will usually, if possible, include:

  •  the identity of the person who died
  •  the time, date and location where the death occurred
  • a summary of the evidence relating to the circumstances of the death, in some cases
  • comments and/or recommendations made by coroner aimed at preventing similar deaths, in some cases

A written finding following an investigation into a fire will usually, if possible, include:

  • the cause of the fire, that is how it was ignited
  • the origin of the, that is where it started
  • a summary of the evidence relating to the circumstances surrounding the fire, in some cases
  • comments and/or recommendations made by a coroner aimed at prevent similar fires, in some cases 

 

The coroner is the only person who can make a written finding.

The length of a written finding can vary from a single page to numerous pages depending on how complex the investigation is.

A written finding is made regardless of whether an inquest is held or not. 

A written finding made following an inquest is usually delivered in court by the coroner and is called a Finding With Inquest.

A written finding made following an investigation that did not proceed to an inquest is called a Finding Without Inquest.